Ohio Regulators Reject Autism And OCD As Medical Pot Qualifying Conditions

Ohio regulators have recently turned down a proposal that would have allowed medical marijuana to be used as a treatment for autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The decision has been met with disappointment from many advocates of medical marijuana, who believe that it could be an effective treatment for these conditions.

The proposal was put forward by the Ohio Medical Board, which is responsible for setting the regulations governing the state’s medical marijuana program. The board had recommended that autism and OCD should be added to the list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana, which currently includes conditions such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, multiple sclerosis, and chronic pain.

However, the Ohio Board of Pharmacy, which is responsible for implementing the medical marijuana program, rejected the recommendation. The board argued that there was not enough scientific evidence to support the use of medical marijuana to treat autism and OCD. They also noted that the existing research on the use of medical marijuana for these conditions was limited, and that further studies were needed before any changes could be made.

The decision has been met with criticism from many advocates of medical marijuana, who argue that the board’s decision is based on outdated and incomplete research. They point to a growing body of evidence that suggests medical marijuana can be an effective treatment for autism and OCD. For example, a recent study by the University of California, San Diego found that medical marijuana could help reduce symptoms of autism, such as anxiety and aggression.

Advocates of medical marijuana also argue that the board’s decision is a missed opportunity to provide relief to those suffering from autism and OCD. They point out that the medical marijuana program in Ohio is already helping thousands of people with a variety of conditions, and that denying access to those with autism and OCD is a disservice to those who could benefit from it.

The debate over the use of medical marijuana to treat autism and OCD is likely to continue in Ohio and other states. In the meantime, advocates of medical marijuana will continue to push for more research into the potential benefits of the drug for these conditions.